Reflections : ChalI-Rosso Gallery Project : Vancouver

A select group of talented artists has been challenged to create works of art that are directly inspired by any of the masterworks in Chali-Rosso’s gallery collection. This includes original works by Picasso, Matisse, Dali, Miro, Chagall, Motherwell, Hirst, Lichtenstein, Warhol and many others.The contemporary works will be exhibited next to their inspirational works by the Masters. This exciting project aims to illustrate how relevant the art of the Modern Masters continues to be and how their influence can still be felt in the contemporary art of today. In addition to the academic value, the goal of the exhibition is to gain a visual experience about how art is continual and successive.

Alternate Ending III - a response to Robert Motherwell's "Untitled II"

Alternate Ending III - a response to Robert Motherwell's "Untitled II"

Robert Motherwell lithograph "Untitled II" is the masterpiece from Chali Rosso Gallery I chose as inspiration

Robert Motherwell lithograph "Untitled II" is the masterpiece from Chali Rosso Gallery I chose as inspiration

works in progress

The gallery has partnered with some of the finest, accomplished, local artists to create a group show dedicated solely to exploring how art and artists are connected, through time and space, due to infinite influence and inspiration.

Works in progress in my Vancouver Studio - Responses i, II and III  - Oil and cold wax on double sided technical paper. 

Works in progress in my Vancouver Studio - Responses i, II and III  - Oil and cold wax on double sided technical paper. 

 

Explication for Joan Miro

It is Joan Miro‘s precise style; the way each element is isolated and arranged in a “deliberate composition” that appeals to me. The coexistence of recognizable forms with those pulled directly from his imagination form a poetic realism that speaks to my version of reality.
In the process of creating his unique pictoral spaces, Miro balanced spontaneity with meticulous rendering. He initiated each artwork by “provoking accidents” and by allowing his materials guide him. His later additions of relatable forms; sickle moons, stars and ladders are representative of both the cosmos and the material realm he wanted to escape.
I have a similar process; using automatic painting in the initial stages of my work with no concern for outcome. Over several years, I have also developed recurring motifs that I use to maintain precise, balanced compositions. Abstracted, balloons, moons, fences are prevalent in my imagined backgrounds. They are loaded symbols intended to invoke childhood memories and allude to concept of freedom.
Miro’s “Constellations” painted after World War II, are described by his grandson as “a sublime break” and as “a door to escape . . . the brutality of nonsense”. In response to his “Personnage Blesse”, I am also in pursuit of escape. “Picket Fence II, III and IV” are about the emancipation of creative expression. Using basic geometric forms and a limited colour palette, my aim is to eliminate distraction from the noise of expectation.

 

Explication for Robert Motherwell

Motherwell’s desire and ability to tap into raw, emotional energy inspires me. Using pure imagination as his weapon, he laid siege to traditional, European painting by letting impulse rather than ready-made ideas guide him. Motherwell employed psychic automatism, or free association to arrive at truth and authenticity which he considered to be the root of postwar American painting in New York.
My responses to Motherwell’s lithograph, “Untitled II”, are a reaction to the essence of his work; his use of black and white to express life and death, being and non-being.
As an abstract painter, I am challenged and elated by my attempts to paint raw, emotional experiences. By stripping my work to its essentials and by allowing myself to work fluidly, without judgement in the initial stages of my process, I am able to reach a different level of creative consciousness. Inevitably, reduction and correction happen.
I consider “Alternate Ending I and III” to be declarations of both hope and despair. In keeping with Motherwell’s emphasis on the struggle of painting, I am relying on black and white to fight for supremacy in a personal narrative about the painting process itself. This body of work is the “residue” of my own epic battle with authenticity.

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